TBS Education professors and researchers Akram AL ARISS and Samuel FOSSO WAMBA are among the TOP 2% of the most cited researchers in the world according to the Elsevier BV report drawn up by Stanford University researchers in 2022.

Akram AL ARISS, professor of Human Resources Management at TBS Education, welcomed the accolade, saying,

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“It is a form of recognition by our peers that our work has an impact and a utility for others in the scientific community. Personally, it is always motivating to see such a result. It encourages me to continue working on topics that have a scientific, practical, and social impact. For TBS Education, I think, it shows that its faculty has an important impact worldwide.”

– Akram AL ARISS, professor of Human Resources Management at TBS Education

Samuel FOSSO WAMBA, whose work has figured on the list twice before, said,

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“I am happy to be part of the list for the third time. This is a recognition of the quality of our work by our peers. At the school level, this is a fantastic outcome of all the investments realized by the school to promote cutting-edge research in the school.”

– Samuel FOSSO WAMBA, Head of Research department and professor in Information Systems and Data Science at TBS Education

Since 2019, scientists at Stanford University have published annual data of the top 2% of the world’s most-cited scientists in 22 scientific fields and 176 subfields. The list is described as :

“A publicly available database of top-cited scientists that provides standardized information on citations, h-index, co-authorship adjusted hm-index, citations to papers in different authorship positions and a composite indicator (c-score).” – Elsevier BV

The ranking recognizes the outstanding contribution made by the work of Akram AL ARISS and Samuel FOSSO WAMBA and will impact their academic careers and the reputation of the research carried out at TBS Education.

This special issue focuses on the effects and possible solutions to gender disparities caused by the Gender Data Gap. Analysing this data gap with its effects and possible solutions in detail will deepen our knowledge of gender-based discrepancies and their origins and implications. Below, we present a number of lines of inquiry that seem particularly fruitful in stimulating novel theoretical insights.

Topics of interest

Evolution, perpetuation and reproduction of the Gender Data Gap

The following are possible questions that contributors might address:

  • How do the individual characteristics and behaviours of managers and leaders accentuate or attenuate the effects of the Gender Data Gap?
  • What interpersonal processes maintain and reproduce versus interrupt the effects of the data gap?
  • How (i.e. through what processes and mechanisms) do organisational cultures facilitate versus prevent the development and perpetuation of the Gender Data Gap?
  • How do firm- and industry-level factors contribute to Gender Data Gap effects on women’s careers?

Effects of the Gender Data Gap on women

Possible questions include, but are not limited to:

  • How does the Gender Data Gap affect women’s careers and upward mobility?
  • To what extent do Gender Data Gaps cause or exacerbate toxic cultures and workplaces?
  • How do various social actors (HR managers, activist organisations, headhunters, the media, universities and business schools) help maintain or close the data gap and with what consequences?
  • How can our management and organisation theories be extended and strengthened by making ‘invisible acts’ (e.g. instrumental work activities done by women that are neither recognised nor rewarded) more visible?

Effects of the Gender Data Gap on intervention effectiveness

Accordingly, we encourage questions such as (but not exclusive to):

  • What are the assumptions in management and organisation studies that must be revisited based on novel insights derived from efforts to close the Gender Data Gap?
  • How does the Gender Data Gap intersect with cross-cutting systems of disadvantage (e.g. race, age and ability)? What are the implications for the effectiveness of interventions designed to ‘help women’?

In sum, we encourage contributions that address any of the above issues. We propose that the development and facilitation of the data gap, as well as its effects on women’s careers and wellbeing, should be approached from a multi-phenomenal and multi-level perspective that comprises leadership, values, norms and goals at the managerial and organisational levels.

Submission instructions

Every manuscript submitted to this special issue must provide both theoretical/conceptual and practical contributions. Conceptual, review and empirical papers will all be considered.

All submissions are subject to the European Management Journal’s double-blind peer review process, should respect the journal’s general publication guidelines and should be submitted through https://www.editorialmanager.com/eumj/default1.aspx between 1st August and 18th September, 2023. The special issue will be published in 2025.

To ensure that all manuscripts are correctly identified for consideration for this special issue, it is important that authors select ‘SI: Gender Data Gap’ as the paper type. Please direct any questions about the special issue to Dr Sonja Sperber (sonja.sperber@wu.ac.at).

Objectives of the Special Issue 

Self-initiated expatriation has attracted a growing interest since the classical articles by Inkson, Arthur, Pringle and Barry (1997) and Suutari and Brewster (2000). By now, we have gained a general understanding of the phenomenon. However, looking at the samples underlying publications on self-initiated expatriates (SIEs) shows that the term SIE has been employed to cover a large variety of distinct populations that differ in a number of key contextual factors such as educational level, profession, gender and family status, country of origin and destination country as well as employing organizations. 

But context matters: expatriates in and from different places, at different times and in different kinds of organizations present different challenges for SIEs which impacts the extent of required personal initiative, their work experiences and career trajectories (Andresen, Pattie, & Hippler, 2020). For instance, diverse dangers in physically (COVID-19 pandemic, terrorism) or psychological environments have a substantial impact on SIEs’ behaviors, attitudes and careers (Bader, Schuster, & Dickmann, 2019). In most of SIE research samples are mixed, allowing us to draw only limited conclusions about the relevance and influence of contextual factors. This impedes the systematic comparison and integration of SIE knowledge. Thus, the role of context and its impact on SIEs’ career-related decisions and behaviours needs further exploration.  

Call for Papers

Submissions to the Special Issue are open to participants attending the 2nd International Conference on Self-Initiated Expatriation and all other authors. Submissions to CDI open 30th April 2022 and the submission due date is 30th July 2022.

Please submit enquiries to Maike.Andresen@uni-bamberg.de

Submissions should be made through ScholarOne Manuscripts: 
https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/cdevi

Specific details on the format for submitted manuscripts can be found at the journal’s website https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/cdi  

Please direct any general questions about the journal or any administrative matters to the Editor, Professor Jim Jawahar (jimoham@ilstu.edu). 

Illustrative topics  

Exemplary research questions within the intended scope of this Special Issue include, but are not limited to, the following: 

1. Contextual influences of space on SIEs 

  • How are home and host country conditions impacting on self-initiated expatriation? 
  • How is the quality of the host environment shaping the experiences and career journeys of SIEs?  
  • What is the role of physical threats (COVID-19; crime, terrorism, nature) and psychological dangers (fear, anxiety, stress induced by the context) shaping the career patterns of SIEs? 

2. Contextual influence of time on SIEs 

  • How does the temporality of contextual conditions influence the life-course and career patterns of SIEs?  
  • What are the longitudinal effects of accumulation, transfer and utilization of career and human capital of SIEs? 
  • How does context shape the careers of self-initiated repatriates? 

3. Contextual influence of institutions on SIEs 

  • How do macro-societal factors, including economic circumstances, labour and immigration laws and institutional arrangements influence the careers of self-initiated expatriates? 
  • How do occupational patterns, regulations and customs affect SIEs and their careers? 
  • How do organizational configurations, HR approaches and culture shape SIEs’ attitudes and behaviours in relation to their careers? 

The second annual “Social & Innovation Marketing lab” workshop will be held on site, at Toulouse Business School, on June 23rd. The workshop’s theme is “Marketing in turbulent times”.

We are experiencing unprecedented challenges due to several critical events. Whether environmental, geopolitical, technological, economic, or social, these critical occurrences dramatically affect our daily life, including business decisions and consumption choices. Marketing scholars and practitioners need to better understand the major changes in consumption to face such turbulent times.

We will talk about Marketing in turbulent times with two key speakers: Professor Aimee Drolet from University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) and Professor Andrea Ordanini from Bocconi University Milan. 

We invite researchers, doctoral students, students, and practitioners to join this event. Do not hesitate to register by selecting one of the two options below:

  • Research day with lunch: €40
  • Research day with lunch and dinner: €80.

We are looking forward to welcoming you to Toulouse, la ville rose !

Registration

Before June, 20th, 2022

  • Payment by bank transfer only (the bank details will be sent to you in the registration confirmation email).

More informations : Linda HAMDI-KIDAR, l.hamdi-kidar@tbs-education.fr

The Finance Crowd Analysis Project is offering an unrivaled meta-scientific view in empirical Finance. 164 research teams worked on this project, an exceptional number in this field. It involved researchers from 207 institutions and 34 countries including central bank economists.

2 TBS Education associate professors involved in #fincap

Two TBS Education associate professors, Anna Calamia and Debrah Meloso, are co-authors of the research paper Non-standard-errors coming from Fincap. Anna and Debrah are professors in the department of Economics and Finance and are affiliated to the Finance, Economics, and Econometrics research laboratory at TBS Education. Their research has focused on the functioning of financial markets and they are engaged in several other projects together.

The first crowd-sourced empirical paper in Economics/Finance

Have you ever wondered whether researchers using the same data set to address a unique research question would come to the same conclusions? Fincap tried to answer this complex question.

This innovative project attracted eminent researchers, including some from the most prestigious French finance department. Fincap was run by project coordinators Anna Dreber, Felix Holzmeister, Juergen Huber, Magnus Johannesson, Michael Kirchler, Albert J. Menkveld, Sebastian Neusuess, Michael Razen, and Utz Weitzel from the Stockholm School of Economics, the University of Innsbruck, and the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam.

Abstract

In statistics, samples are drawn from a population in a data-generating process (DGP). Standard errors measure the uncertainty in sample estimates of population parameters. In science, evidence is generated to test hypotheses in an evidence-generating process (EGP). We claim that EGP variation across researchers adds uncertainty: non-standard errors. To study them, we let 164 teams test six hypotheses on the same sample. We find that non-standard errors are sizeable, on par with standard errors. Their size (i) co-varies only weakly with team merits, reproducibility, or peer rating, (ii) declines significantly after peer-feedback, and (iii) is underestimated by participants.

Gilles Lafforgue has been appointed member of the Commission on the Economy of Sustainable Development (CEDD) of the French Ministry of Ecological Transition. The title of qualified personality for his economic expertise was awarded to him in this context. Very involved in the research sphere in terms of sustainable development and recognized for his economic expertise, this professor-researcher at TBS Education had participated in the French Carbon Commission from 2017 to 2019. His involvement and the recognition of his high skills are confirmed with this new appointment.

The role of the Commission on Sustainable Development Economics

The CEDD was created on November 10, 2020 at the initiative of the French Prime Minister and the French Minister of Ecological Transition. It succeeds the Economic Council for Sustainable Development. The CEDD provides assistance to French public decision-making on sustainable development from an economic perspective.

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The mission of this consultative commission is to provide insight into the fields of the environment, energy and climate, transportation and housing. To do this, it relies on the analysis of statistical data and the comparison of economic analyses, the development and evaluation of public policies in these areas.

The objective of the “Environment” group

The professor-researcher will participate more specifically in the work of the “Environment” group, whose objective is to examine and discuss the economic accounts of the environment (monetary and physical flows relating to natural environments, natural resources, the circular economy, or the reduction of emissions and consumption).

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By Silvia DELLO RUSSO

©FNEGE

Together with a group of international colleagues from the 5C Collaborative (www.5c.careers), I studied employability, defined as an individual’s perception of being able to find alternative jobs in the external labor market. I have studied this subject with particular attention to older workers, as individuals are forced to work longer in their lives; paradoxically, however, as they age, they face great discrimination when seeking or re-employment. We conducted a survey in 30 countries and collected responses from over 9,000 people employed in managerial or professional jobs. By analyzing this data, we were able to show that older workers perceive a disadvantage in terms of external employability, but that having experienced development activities throughout their career mitigates this situation.

Discover TBS professor Louise Curran’s point of view on the effect of COVID-19 on international trade policies.

As COVID-19 has spread across the world it has had major impacts on supply chains. It is reasonable to assume that the impact on trade flows may be even greater than that for the GFC in 2009, where world trade fell by over 20%. Most of this is an entirely natural result of the closure of many production structures around the world. However, some trade impacts are the direct result of trade policy interventions by governments, which presage a more major and long-term impact from the current crisis. Discover more in the video below:

[Série – Face à la crise Covid-19] How will Covid-19 impact international trade policies ? from FNEGE MEDIAS on Vimeo.

Discover TBS professor Timo Mandler’s point of view on building brands in markets that have reached the post-globalization stage.

Consumers in Western markets are increasingly critical towards globalization and re-embrace local values. Companies thus must decide whether to continue to pursue global branding strategies and/or rejuvenate local branding strategies. To explore the implications of market globalization for consumer preferences, we use signaling theory to investigate the role of perceived brand globalness and localness as signals of brand credibility, related downstream effects and boundary conditions, across two countries with differing levels of globalization. In globalized markets, brand globalness is a weaker signal of brand credibility than brand localness, whereas in globalizing markets, the two signals are of equal importance.

Building Credible Brands in (Post-)Globalizing Markets from FNEGE MEDIAS on Vimeo.

By Yuliya SNIHUR

To establish an innovative business model, disruptive start-ups use a strategy resting on two complementary processes: building a discourse which will engage clients and partners in the new ecosystem, also known as framing, and continuous adaptation of their business model in response to the needs of clients. This will be illustrated by the case of Salesforce versus Siebel in the business software industry at the start of the 2000s.

Cases of successful disruptive innovation, where a start-up manages to radically transform the functioning of an industry, remain exceptional. Among the best-known are Amazon with the distribution and sale of books or Netflix which revolutionised the film distribution industry in the United States. They have resulted in the creation of a new business model which shifts the industrial ecosystem’s centre of gravity away from the historic leader and towards the start-up, and ends up creating a new ecosystem around the start-up. Business
model innovation is characterised by new sources of value creation, the arrival of new clients and partners and the implementation of a new kind of organisation, which rivals the business model of the historic leader and gradually replaces it.

Revealing one’s intentions from the outset

Up until now, studies of disruptive innovation have been more interested in the reaction of existing businesses, and much less in the manner in which the start-up succeeded in establishing its business model. Hence, the importance of understanding the processes set
in motion by the disruptor, which starts off with slender means with which to attract clients, partners, the media and analysts, and ends up taking the lead over an established and much more powerful competitor, and in some cases, making it disappear.
This is the process that we call the disruptor strategy, whose aim is to reduce uncertainty in order to engage consumers and partners as players in the creation of the new ecosystem: from the outset, in order to get their attention and support, the start-up reveals its
intentions and ambitions through framing, ie, the construction of an effective discourse and presentation. At the same time, it must adapt its business model and its product to achieve the best possible offer for its clients and partners. The combination of these two actions
creates a virtuous circle and puts the historic leader on the horns of a dilemma: retaliate at the risk of legitimising the new business model, or do nothing and risk being overtaken.

Salesforce and the emergence of the cloud

The study of the emergence of Salesforce between 1999 and 2006 against Siebel in the management and client relation (CRM) software sector illustrates the concept of disruptor strategy. Originally, software publishers (Siebel, SAP) sold their clients CRM software and
costly products associated with maintenance and consulting services. Salesforce’s innovation consisted of coming up with a much less expensive business model, based on cloud computing, with SaaS services available by subscription. In the first instance, this product was aimed at consumers who were not part of the Siebel ecosystem.
Before Salesforce had even launched, it was already addressing the ecosystem with a discourse emphasising its unique affinity with the “no software” revolution, and then its leadership, via press releases, interviews and dramatic stunts. This framing found an echo with start-ups and small-to-medium-sized businesses lacking the means to invest in a heavy system; with partners interested in the new ecosystem; and with the media and analysts who relayed and amplified Salesforce’s discourse and took up a more critical position in relation to Siebel. At the same time as new consumers were starting to get interested in the product, Salesforce was continually improving it to reach the standards expected by the majority of existing consumers. By combining these two framing processes and adapting the business model, the start-up had started to seduce Siebel’s clients and partners within two or three years.
In the face of Salesforce’s offensive, Siebel didn’t react at first. The firm stayed with its old model without taking account of the new needs created by a competitor which it didn’t yet perceive as such. It only launched into the cloud in 2003, three years late. A vicious circle, symmetrical with Salesforce’s virtuous circle, falls into place: poor responses, mounting criticism in the media and from analysts, mass exodus of clients and partners to the new ecosystem. Finally, in 2006, Salesforce became the leading supplier of CRM services, while Siebel was bought by Oracle.

A situation that was hard to predict

The Salesforce-Siebel case is a prime example of the establishment of a new business model. It highlights the importance of these two complementary processes of framing and adaptation in the disruptor’s strategy. This is, of course, an individual case, but it shares elements with other cases of successful disruption like Amazon and Netflix. For businesses, there are a number of lessons to be learned from these results. For the disruptors, it’s about the importance of pulling on both levers at the same time, given that the temporal window is limited. That means they have to find a way to reveal themselves clearly, but without being too precise, so as not to limit their scope for adaptation. In its framing, Salesforce presented itself as the leader by stating that it was offering a better value product and that its service was cheaper, but without going into the key points of the new business model.

For the leader, it’s hard to know how to react. Siebel had logical reasons for not responding to Salesforce in a market sector in which – at first at least – it had no interest. It’s very tricky to predict whether a start-up will be successfully disruptive or not. The problem is that Salesforce gained a competitive advantage by learning faster than Siebel. Siebel didn’t ask itself the right questions for several years, and the needs of Salesforce’s start-up clients were ahead of the needs of its own clients. When the firm did finally take action, its cloud didn’t function as well as Salesforce’s one, despite an R&D budget and far greater human resources.

To avoid this, existing businesses must therefore develop a strategic vision, an understanding of what is happening in their environment, in order to try to learn more quickly than the start-ups and be attentive to the market of tomorrow. But it’s very difficult for a firm to say that in 10 years’ time its clients will want products that are completely different from those it has on offer today.


Methodology

This article is a synthesis of the publication “An Ecosystem-Level Process Model of Business Model Disruption: The Disruptor’s Gambit”, published in the Journal of Management Studies. It presents the results of a longitudinal study carried out by Yuliya Snihur (Toulouse Business School), Llewellyn D.W. Thomas (Imperial College London, Universitat Ramon Llull) and Robert A. Burgelman (Stanford School of Graduate Business), from the case study of Salesforce and Siebel, combining a theoretical approach and the analysis of a documentary base of historic data.